Monday, October 6, 2008

My Weekend Cigar: Famous Private Selection Nicaraguan Corojo Churchill

A few months ago I started getting flurry of positive emails about the Famous Private Selection Nicaraguan Corojo cigars. I attributed this to some good "word-of-mouth" postings on several cigar community sites. Then, about a month ago, my office roomie, Hayward, picked up a box of Churchills (7" x 50) on sale and gave me one. While picking through my humidor this weekend, my eye caught sight of it, and since I hadn't smoked one in quite a while, I figured it would make a good subject for today's posting.

Handmade at Tabacalera Tropical in Nicaragua, these "puro" cigars have a blend of robust Nicaraguan Cuban-seed Ligero longfiller tobaccos rolled in Nicaraguan Cuban-seed Corojo wrapper. Famous Smoke Shop lists them as "full-bodied," but to my palate, they were closer to medium-bodied cigar with a "full flavor" profile.

The cigar showed signs of good overall construction, with just one little soft spot about two inches below the head, and the cap clipped off neatly. The pre-lit flavor was leathery, nutty and earthy, with an easy draw. Once lit, the cigar offered-up a smooth, creamy and well-balanced smoke dominated by flavors of sweet cedar and nutmeg laced with notes of white pepper.

During the last third, some of this cigar's spicier elements became a little more prevalent, but over the course of entire smoke, the cigar didn't change all that much. However, I liked the primarily "earthy" and dark tobacco flavor of this particular cigar, so I give it high marks for consistency. It also went well with my glass of Port. On the other hand, it did turn bitter in the last inch, but having smoked extremely well through those first six inches, I'd say that's pretty darn good.

If you read the reviews for Famous Private Selection Nicaraguan Corojo on their website, they're quite mixed, but there are hardly any comments for this size. Therefore, if you want to take a shot with this blend, I suggest starting with the Churchill. For the money, they're a good buy and they age-up well over time.

~ Gary Korb

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