Monday, June 8, 2009

My Weekend Cigar: Famous 70th Anniversary Garcia Family Robusto


After a fun-filled weekend spent with my two sons, last night I finally got to kick back and enjoy a new cigar on my deck as I watched the moon rise in a ball of blazing orange. The cigar is one of newest 70th Anniversary releases to arrive at Famous Smoke Shop: The Famous 70th Garcia Family cigars series. The "family" the label refers to is that of Don Jose Pepin Garcia. The cigars are made at his factory in Nicaragua with an all-Nicaraguan filler & binder blend deftly rolled in a dark Nicaraguan Habano Rosado Oscuro wrapper.

Many of you know I work for Famous Smoke Shop, so you can take this critique with the proverbial "grain of salt" if you like. But whether you choose to take my word or not, this cigar was one helluva smoke.

Act I: The construction was first-rate: densely packed; a flawless wrapper with barely noticeable veins, and a dark, chocolately patina. When lit, I detected a strong floral aroma. I've noticed this at times when I smoke outdoors. Maybe because the air was heavy with fresh Spring flowers and pollen (I'm just guessing), but it was very appealing. Here, in the first stage, the smoke also had a pleasant herbal character and wasn't as spicy as expected. As it continued to smoke into the first inch, I picked up a strong woody flavor laced with a fruity sweetness, similar to cherries, and some spicy notes. Not a peppery spice, something more exotic that was hard to identify. All I know is I liked it.

Act II: At this point the cigar had a familiarity to it; was similar in flavor and strength to the Nestor Miranda Special Selection Robusto I smoked a couple of weeks ago, which is also made by Pepin. The wrappers are similar, too, which may account for the coincidence, but the 70th Garcia Family Robusto had a much deeper and darker tobacco flavor. So, if you've had any of the NMSS, I suggest comparing them for yourself.

Act III: The smoke shifted to stronger wood and spice flavors and was more peppery, too, while the fruity element had all but ceased. At about the one-an-a-half-inch mark I noticed it starting to turn a bit, but kept it going to about three-quarters-of-an-inch before putting it down.

As full-flavored cigars go, it hit on all cylinders. I would also like to smoke this cigar again after about six months of home aging and compare. I have a good feeling it will improve dramatically.

~ Gary Korb

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